Monday, 19 September 2011

problems with Gillard's laws, townsville address

After speaking at the National Press Club tomorrow I am going to Townsville to continue my efforts to entice both political parties to properly respond to the problems caused by the Fair Work legislation.
My address in Townsville will be early Wednesday morning to the Australasian Convenience and Petroleum Marketers Association.

In preparation for speaking to the ACAMPA I have read some of the Association's recent magazines. Here are some of the points made by ACAPMA about the FWA. They highlight practical real life problems of the Fair Work Act. This list is just a sample of the many problems in legislation supervised by Julia Gillard who says her master piece is working well.

On the case of the Terang students, recently the subject of a FWA ruling

May 2011 Minimum hours, Terang
“…the system was quite adamant hat the employer had to pay for a minimum of three hours i.e. one hour for no productivity. Strange indeed in an economy that continually cries out for greater productivity”

May 2011 : penalty rates
“Another example of where we need to have a good look is the way in which penalty rates are applied in a modern 24/7 environment.” "Why, if someone wishes to work on a Saturday, Sunday or Public Holiday, or an evening or early morning because it suits their lifestyle, is it necessary for an employer to pay a premium?”

August 2010 : negative impacts
“One thing is for certain in this transitioning process – it has been impossible to rationalise the huge number of awards down to around 122 without negatively affecting some groups of employers and employees – the very people that need clarity in their workplace obligations”.

February 2011: unfair dismissals
“unfair dismissals are on the rise with “go away money”

February 2011: inconsistencies
..in recent agreement making applications, three using the same wording were lodged. Two were rejected by one member of FWA and the third approved!”

February 2011 : complex and unfair
A trucking company was fined $30,000 for underpaying but the Magistrate noted that the subsystem was so complex that a group of the “Fair Work Ombudsman, TWU and an employer association could not agree which was the relevant award”



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